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In Remembrance: William N. Frederick

William Frederick passed away on May 11, 2012. In 1946, Frederick began pursuing his BFA and MFA degrees in Art from The School of Art Institute of Chicago, where he subsequently taught for six years. He was a member of the Arts Club of Chicago and a member of Society of American Silversmiths. Among his many diverse projects as a silversmith are some 400 or more chalices that he created, never repeating a design. Consistent and distinctive in his designs is the use of the hammered surface; Frederick preferred the textured instead of the smooth, polished surface. His long career was sustained by word of mouth and the reception of many awards and articles in trade publications. Notable was the support afforded by his life partner of more than fifty years, the noted artist Ralph Arnold, who preceded him in death. Frederick’s creative importance is recognized by many clients, collectors, colleagues, and friends. His work is in several museums including the Art Institute of Chicago.


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Andrew Kuebeck – Volunteer Spotlight

Andrew Kuebeck – Volunteer Spotlight

I graduated with my BFA from Bowling Green State University in 2008 and my MFA in Jewelry Design and Metalsmithing from Indiana University in 2011. Currently I am the Artist in Residence in the Metals department at Bowling Green State University and am working on setting up my own studio. I like to work in a variety of formats ranging from functional jewelry to sculptural objects and vessels, where I enjoy the challenges of switching scale, material, and technique. Within my studio practice my research focus is the incorporation of photographic imagery into my work, switching between photographic processes from traditional to alternative depending on the piece and material I wish to work with. I have been very fortunate in having my work exhibited regionally and nationally, as well as having them appear in issues of Metalsmith and Lark Book Publications.

I first joined SNAG after my high school metals teacher gave me an extra issue of Metalsmith and I was hooked. I was drawn to the breadth of the field, the beautiful works that I saw being created, and my own belief that working in metals ensured some sort of immortality. I have had the pleasure of attending SNAG conferences and enjoy the opportunities that SNAG provides professionally, interpersonally, and educationally, and saw volunteering as a small way of giving back.


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“Mitsuro-hikime: A Casting Wax”

Several years ago I became interested in jewelry pieces with a distinctive grooved design. At first glance they appear to be engraved or constructed of multiple wires, but on closer examination, they are cast. The grooves are actually achieved in the wax, not the metal. I set out to research waxes and develop a formula.

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Lynn Floriano – Volunteer Spotlight

threeLynn Floriano is a working artist and educator. She exhibits her contemporary enamels and jewelry in the Chicago area. She has exhibited her work with the American Craft Council and the Chicago Merchandise Mart. Her work is currently traveling with The International Enamelist’s Society Exhibit “Alchemy.” Her work has been purchased by museum stores, corporations, and individuals and she has won numerous awards. Her work has been featured in Art Jewelry Magazine (January 2012, Gallery) and published in American Art Collector (Alcove Books).

Her love of color is easily satisfied by the medium of enameling. She incorporates in her pieces the techniques of limoge, cloisonné and grisaille enamels. She enjoys the rich surfaces, textures and depth she can achieve with enamels. She combines metals and enamels to make them do what may seem uncharacteristic; flow, bend, appear fragile, hold precious things. Her work is reminiscent of the elegant forms of nature, which is forever evolving and generating new inspiration.

Lynn teaches in the Art and Design Department at Columbia College, Chicago (adjunct faculty) and at College of Lake County in the Fine Arts Dept (adjunct faculty). She has also taught workshops at Columbia College/Chicago and Bowling Green State University, Ohio, where she received her M.A. and M.F.A.

Lynn’s time is limited with teaching, family and studio work but she enjoys volunteering when she can.


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2012 Lifetime Achievement Award

LAA_Fred_Woell, Eleanor, CindySNAG is proud to present the 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award to J. Fred Woell

J. Fred Woell has had a successful career in art and education that spans 50 years. He’s taught quite a number of well-known jewelry artists, and is noted for being the first in the field to work with cast found objects and found objects in his metalwork for political and social commentary.

WoellSocialSecurity“I make things I hope people can laugh at and yet take seriously. I use my work as a platform to express my reaction to things I see around me. I use humor in my work to make the serious nature of those things bearable.

It is my aim to make an object look complete and posses a quality that gives the work a presence or life of its own. I try hard to keep the freshness of my fingerprint on the work and to maintain an intimate, spontaneous quality that will give it a timeless character. I work largely with found objects that come into my life by serendipity. I do my best to allow these “things” I assemble to come together and form unique objects. Taking the chance of assembling these things means some things must be changed and even destroyed when they are assembled. It makes the work a discovery and keeps the creative process edgy. ”

WoellMetalsmithCoverHis pieces are in the permanent collections of museums across the country, including the American Craft Museum, the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian, the Contemporary Museum of Honolulu, the Detroit Institute of Art, and the Cranbrook Academy of Art Museum.

Woell’s work has been published in Metalsmith and Ornament magazines, numerous jewelry reference books, and he’s the author of Handouts from the 20th Century: A Collection of Teaching Aids Created and Gathered by J. Fred Woell During 20 Years of Teaching.

Woell_TheGoodTheBadHis teaching career has included teaching positions at Boston University; Swain School of Design, New Bedford, Mass.; Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; and the State University of New York at New Paltz.

Woell has received 3 National Endowment for the Arts Grants, an American Craft Council award (1995), a Society of Arts and Crafts Arts Award (2004), a “Master Craft Artist Recognition” by the Maine Crafts Association (2009), and in 2010, The Florida Society of Goldsmiths named Woell the recipient of their National Metalsmith’s Hall of Fame award.

FredWoell1987Metalsmith