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Linking Our Lineage, Volume 2

Linking Our Lineage Vol 2 coverLinking Our Lineage, Volume 2 is an ebook of jewelry and metalsmithing techniques with chapters by Linda Threadgill, Sessin Durgham, Charles Pinckney, Deanna Pastel, Jennifer Jordan Park, James Binnion, Ezra Satok-Wolman, John Lunn, Ken Bova, Sarah Michaela Sitarz, Parker Brown, Tina Wiltsie, and edited by Victoria Lansford. The processes illustrated range from beginning to advanced and are presented with over 190 color photographs and 3 videos.

The links created and written about by each artist were part of the 2016 SNAG Links project, a fundraiser for SNAG. All proceeds from the book benefit SNAG.

Learn more and purchase Linking Our Lineage>>>


SNAG would like to take this opportunity to recognize our Corporate Members for their support: Aaron Faber Gallery, Halstead, NextFab, and Pocosin Arts.

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Technical Article: “Swaging” by Boris Bally

Swaging is a forging process in which the dimensions of an item are altered using a die or dies, into which the item is forced. Swaging is usually a cold working process. However, it may be done as a hot working process. The term “swage” can apply to the process of swaging (verb), or to a die or tool used for swaging (noun). In 2000, I developed this method specifically for attaching pin findings to re-purposed traffic signs, enabling me to use the colorful, reflective fragments as brooches. My technique works best on the soft, thick (usually 2.5mm +) aluminum traffic sign sheet.

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“Mitsuro-hikime: A Casting Wax”

Several years ago I became interested in jewelry pieces with a distinctive grooved design. At first glance they appear to be engraved or constructed of multiple wires, but on closer examination, they are cast. The grooves are actually achieved in the wax, not the metal. I set out to research waxes and develop a formula.

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