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SNAG Celebrates: Emily Culver

SNAG Celebrates

SNAG celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2019 and is honoring its membership by highlighting different artists on the SNAG website.

Emily Culver_Headshot_PhotoByArtist

 

Please introduce yourself.
My name is Emily Culver and I identify as an object maker. I am originally from rural Pennsylvania and the daughter of a carpenter and former midwife now turned nursing professor. I mention these details because I think it reflects in my work, however intentional or unintentional that may be.

I attended the Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Temple University in Philadelphia, where I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts in Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM in 2012. In 2017, I received my Master of Fine Arts in Metalsmithing from Cranbrook Academy of Art.

My current work situates itself broadly across forms and scales, ranging from body sized sculptures to hand-held objects, as well as between Fine Art, Craft and Design disciplines. I employ a vast variety of materials such as wood, ceramic, metal and rubbers while implementing both digital fabrication methods and traditional making processes in a holistic manner. While diverse in approach and method, at the foundation of my work is a sensitive and highly intended relationship between objects and the body; a quality which I feel comes from my strong background and interest in Jewelry.

Flails, 2019

Flails, 2019


What are some goals that you have while creating your work? Are there any concepts that you are particularly interested in?

I strive to create works that are a productive space of ambiguity — a space in which the work is not flat in its directiveness but also feeds the viewer enough to keep them engaged. The works which interest me the most are ones where I feel I’ve entered into a conversation with an object, but this is actually a conversation with myself. These relational conversations I create do not have a clear resolution per say, rather my goal is to create something in which I am engaged, satisfied, and sustained.

For this reason I’m particularly interested in the object and the body as concepts and all the topics that are stirred up as a result: function/non-function, identity, desire, the corporeal, sexuality, and touch to list a few. With my most recent body of work I’ve been considering more metaphysical qualities of these things such as what they are made of, how they have come to be and what potential they hold.

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SNAG Celebrates: Tanya Crane

SNAG Celebrates

SNAG celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2019 and is honoring its membership by highlighting different artists on the SNAG website.

Tanya Crane

photo credit Laura Jamison


Please introduce yourself.
My name is Tanya Crane. I’m a California native. I’ve moved roughly 25 times, and am currently living in Boston, Massachusetts where I am a Professor of the Practice in Metals at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts. I have a BFA in Metal from SUNY New Paltz and an MFA in Metal/Jewelry from the University of Wisconsin Madison. I create both jewelry and sculptural objects. My medium of choice is copper and enamel, but I also use materials that support my research, such as various grasses for weaving, raw stones, decaying steel, wrought iron and detritus from my immediate landscape. My black and white sgraffito work is something that I repeat a lot in my compositions as I feel it’s a way for me to continue my story from piece to piece.

What are some goals that you have while creating your work? Are there any concepts that you are particularly interested in?
I like to keep my designs simple and to the point. There’s usually a bit of nostalgia paired with a response to my current landscape in most of my pieces. I feel it is important to make sure my voice is seen in every piece I create, which references both black history and my history.

Tanya Crane_RainBrooch_2018

Rain Brooch


What does your work mean to you? Why create these objects?

Jewelry is one the oldest forms of self-expression. It is a way to show your individuality and your link to a certain group or culture. Jewelry is constantly evolving as cultures evolve. Cultures are analyzed and studied through material objects. These objects, which tell a story about a single moment ultimately link me and the people who wear my creations to that moment.

How has the field of metalsmithing and jewelry evolved since you began your career?
I’ve noticed stylistic changes in the field of jewelry as particular movements linked to social change occur. For instance, in the early 2000’s “found object” jewelry and “assemblage” jewelry was very popular to create. This movement lead to the DIY movement in which people who wanted to try their hand at the lucrative side of creativity could link up to this assemblage concept and create jewelry which became know as Steam Punk. This is just one instance I’ve noticed, and there are many more.

Tanya Crane_Continued Decay_2019

Continued Decay

 

What are your plans for the future? Is there anything specific that you hope to accomplish in the next year?
I’d love to work more collaboratively with other jewelry artists. As jewelry artists, we often work alone with limited contact beyond social media with our cohorts. There was a great show at NYC Jewelry Week called Borrow/Copy/Steal in which three artists (Isabelle Busnel, Nikki Couppee, Anna Talbot) did a kind of exquisite corpse mash-up where each artist used each other’s material and process. I think what it accomplished most was an understanding among the participating artists the amount of care and regard for material each artist uses to create their work. I think working in this way allows us to slow down a bit and consider what we are creating and what it means to appropriate material, ideas and process. I think some very meaningful work can emerge from this way of working.

Tanya Crane_Lil Pimp_2019

Lil Pimp

 

How and when did first gain a membership with SNAG?
I became a member my first year as a grad student. I wanted to participate in some of the shows and I was planning on attending my first SNAG conference, so I became a member!

More about Tanya: www.tanyamoniquejewelry.com


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SNAG Celebrates: Carissa Hussong

SNAG Celebrates

SNAG is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2019 and is honoring its membership by highlighting different artists on the SNAG website.

Photo courtesy of StyleBlueprint

Photo courtesy of StyleBlueprint


Please introduce yourself.
My name is Carissa Hussong and I am the Executive Director of the Metal Museum in Memphis, TN. I did not follow a logical path to my current position. In college, I thought I wanted to be a magazine editor and majored in English Literature. Immediately after graduating, I went back to school to get a second degree in Art History, followed by a curatorial fellowship at the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York, NY) and a series of internships and paid positions with various arts organizations, including ArtFair/Seattle (Seattle, WA), Gagosian Gallery (New York, NY) and the Dixon Gallery and Gardens (Memphis, TN). While overseeing the UrbanArt Commission, I earned my final degree, an MBA, which, along with the writing skills my first degree drilled into me, has proved invaluable in running a non-profit arts organization.

Metal Museum_Blacksmith Demo_ Ann Klicka

Blacksmithing apprentice Ann Klicka gives a forging demonstration for a group of seniors. Photo courtesy of the Metal Museum.

 

Prior to joining the Metal Museum, I was the founding director of the UrbanArt Commission, which was created to develop and oversee the City of Memphis’s percent for art program. Although I had worked with the former director of the Museum, commissioning several projects, I was definitely an outsider. My background was deeply rooted in “contemporary fine art” – and there was a rumor that I would throw a pile of rebar into a corner and call it art. I was careful and absorbed as much as I could about metalworking, making sure I understood how objects were made and what constituted good craftsmanship. As we have developed our exhibitions and collections policies over the past few years, we have clearly defined this commitment to both the process and the object, making sure that anything we collect or exhibit illustrates fine craftsmanship and aesthetics. Sometimes this means acknowledging our limited knowledge and relying on the expertise of others.

I am not sure what my area of expertise is. It is certainly not metalsmithing. While taking my first blacksmithing class after joining the Museum, the staff joked that I better be “a better fundraiser than blacksmith or we were all in trouble.”  I think we have done pretty well together.

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New Membership Rates for 2020

cropped-SNAG_50_years.jpg
Please note that SNAG will implement a “cost of living” increase for some membership rates beginning January 15, 2020.

  • Standard: 1-year North American currently $94 will be $99; 1-year International currently $109 will be $114; 2-year North American currently $179 will be $184; 2-year International currently $209 will be $214
  • Dual: North American currently $154 will be $159; International currently $169 will be $174
  • Organization: North American currently $225 will be $250; International currently $365 will be $390
  • Corporate: North American currently $500 will be $525; International currently $640 will be $665
  • Student: no changes
  • Emerging: no changes
  • Metalsmith magazine subscription only: no changes

You may wish to renew your membership prior to January 15, 2020 to take advantage of the current rate. Thank you for your continued membership! Renew Now


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SNAG Celebrates: Corkie Bolton

SNAG Celebrates

SNAG is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2019 and is honoring its membership by highlighting different artists on the SNAG website.

Corkie Boton

photo credit @eastern.native

 

Please introduce yourself.
My name is Corkie Bolton and I first started creating jewelry at Ossining High School back in 2002. I fell in love and went on to major in Jewelry Making at Pratt Institute. I love working in silver and gold because you can create an heirloom quality piece that can last for generations. I am also the founder of Metalsmith Society, an Instagram community where jewelers and hobbyists can ask questions, share information and learn.

Garnet Serpent 2019 photo credit @made_x_mason

Garnet Serpent, 2019, photo credit @made_x_mason

 

What are some goals that you have while creating your work? Are there any concepts that you are particularly interested in?
I have always enjoyed learning new fabrication techniques and improving my skills, so I explore many different methods in my work. The desire to improve a skill set, like a specific stone setting can inspire an entire collection.

What does your work mean to you? Why create these objects?
I’ve always felt that urge to create things since I was young, if I’m not creating jewelry I’m knitting or sewing or building a block tower with my kids. To be able to create jewelry that people spend their hard earned money on and make a part of their everyday life is truly an honor and fills me with pride. However even if I never sold a piece, I’d still have to make things because of how happy the process makes me.

Peony Ring 2019 photo credit @made_x_mason

Peony Ring, 2019, photo credit @made_x_mason

 

How has the field of metalsmithing and jewelry evolved since you began your career?
Back in 2007 when I graduated from Pratt the economy took a huge hit, I began to see the era of jewelers selling wholesale to tons of retailers die down. Social media became huge and and at the same time more and more brick and mortars sadly closed. Many jewelers now rely on a direct-to-customer business model. Selling to customers directly from my Instagram account @corkieboltonjewelry is my primary source of sales.

What are your plans for the future? Is there anything specific that you hope to accomplish in the next year?
In 2019 I took an engraving course at GRS Training Center with Sam Alfano, so I’m excited to practice these new skills and see how my work will evolve. My goal for 2020 is to produce small collections every other month comprised of 3-10 one-of-a-kinds. These collections will allow me to focus on a specific idea or technique.

Zinnia Sapphire Necklace 2019 photo credit @eastern.native

Zinnia Sapphire Necklace, 2019, photo credit @eastern.native

 

How and when did first gain a membership with SNAG?
November 2019! I am excited to be a SNAG member and hope to attend the conference one day!

To learn more about Corkie and her work, visit www.corkieboltonjewelry.com