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In Remembrance

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In Remembrance: Ivan Bailey

Ivan BaileyRenowned Blacksmith Ivan Bailey, a Georgia artist and teacher widely considered one of America’s greatest artistic blacksmiths, passed away at his farm in Monticello on September 9, 2013. Born in Oregon, Bailey entered a Christian Brothers’ monastery in Napa, California but left the novitiate to obtain a B.A. in art at Portland State University. He then studied at Penland School, North Carolina and received his MFA in 1971. A forge workshop with Alex W. Bealer, author of the seminal The Art of Blacksmithing and Bailey’s future father-in-law, altered the course of Bailey’s career forever. In 1972 he won a Fulbright fellowship but accepted a larger German cultural exchange grant to study for a year under Professor Fritz Ulrich at the Craft School of Aachen, Germany.

Bailey’s original commissioned work is represented in hundreds of private and public installations and collections, including Savannah’s Olympic Torch monument. His many honors include the Governor’s Award of the Georgia Council for the Arts and the Georgia Association of the American Institute of Architects Award for Craftsmanship. He was a founding member of the Artist Blacksmith’s Association of North America. Bailey retired to Monticello, GA seven years ago. Bailey led an exemplary life, as an artist, a father, and a grandfather.


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In Remembrance: Phil London

Longtime goldsmith Phil London passed away late last month.  Phil was not only the founder and longtime president of the Florida Society of Goldsmiths, he founded the Pennsylvania Society of Goldsmiths, as well as founded the non-profit, Disability Alternatives, which taught jewelry arts to those with physical limitations. Phil London was the second person to be awarded The National Metalsmiths Hall of Fame award which honors and celebrates the outstanding contributions and achievements of artists, educators and patrons that support the metal arts as well as receiving the PMC Fusion award for his work with Disability Alternatives.  Phil is survived by his wife Vickie London.


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In Remembrance: Florence Resnikoff

florenceResnikoff_serpentineJeweler, sculptor, and teacher, Florence Resnikoff, passed away in early April.  Born in 1920, Resnikoff began exploring jewelry and enameling through adult education courses while working as a registered medical technician in Chicago in the 1940s.  After moving to Palo Alto in the early ‘50s, her work grew in leaps and bounds.  Resnikoff met Margaret de Patta through the Metal Arts Guild of San Francisco, who became a significant influence in her work.   She returned to school, receiving her BFA in Sculpture from the California College of Arts and Crafts, and an MFA in Art from San Jose State University.  She also furthered her studies at the Royal College of Art, and with Stanley Lechtzin at Tyler School of Art.

Resnikoff returned to CCAC in 1973 as a teacher and eventually served as Head of the Metal Arts Program there, retiring in 1989.  She was designated a Professor Emerita in 1990, and the Florence Resnikoff Emerita Scholarship Fund was created there at that time.

Resnikoff’s work combined complex electrical-based processes with ancient techniques to create vibrantly colored jewelry and metalwork.  Her involvement with the Metal Arts Guild helped her build her repertoire of techniques and materials in which she accented her gold and silver jewelry with colorful jewels and enamels.  Her later work included both jewelry and liturgical commissions.

Among her many honors and numerous exhibitions, Resnikoff was named a California Living Treasure in 1985. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the City and County of San Francisco, The California Art Collection of the Oakland Art Museum, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Boston Museum of Fine Art, and the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Arts and Design, NY.


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In Remembrance: John Paul Miller

John Paul Miller, the revered  Cleveland Institute of Art professor, 2005 recipient of SNAG’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and one of America’s greatest goldsmiths, passed away last weekend at the age of 94.  Miller designed exquisitely crafted brooches, pendants and rings.  His work has been compared to those of Rene Lalique and Louis Comfort Tiffany.  Miller’s body of work was also collected by notables including the late New York art dealer Lawrence Fleischman and the late Sherman Lee, a former director of the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Miller was born in Huntingdon, PA, in April 1918.  He spent most of his career at the Cleveland Institute of Art while producing custom jewelry for clients of Potter & Mellen, a renowned Cleveland jewelry store.  He is well remembered by friends, students, and collectors for his gentleness and modesty, along with his artistic skills.

 

Miller’s work includes spiders, crabs, and other creatures that crawl or fly, along with jewelry inspired by geological formations.  His work is said to have achieved such recognition, in part, due to his ability to draw inspiration from the natural world, including from his many hiking trips in the Rocky Mountains and Tetons.  He is also recognized for his skill in design and technical perfection.  While less known, Miller also produced work including films, photographs and paintings.

 

Miller is remembered with admiration in the goldsmithing community for his revival of an ancient Egyptian technique called granulation, in which tiny beads of gold are fused to an underlying gold surface to create a glittering, stippled, effect.  Miller has been called “one of the great jewelers and metalsmiths of the century,” by Cleveland Art Institute President, Grafton Nunes.  Nunes also recognized Miller as “one of the giants” at the Institute due to his excellence in teaching and his long-time role as director of the exhibition gallery.  Nunes also commented that Miller “is going to be very sorely missed,” by students and faculty alike.

Miller was one of only two Cleveland artists who have been honored with a retrospective exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art during their lifetimes.  Museum curator, Stephen Harrison, has made note of the incredible power of Miller’s show and the depth of his work.  Harrison said “I’ve had curators who have come through [the show] recently, and everyone who’s seen it has been laid flat.  it’s had real impact, which is fantastic.”

A memorial celebration will be scheduled at the Cleveland Institute of Art.

View a video produced by Jeff Mancinetti of Miller discussing his work and his career.
View a Cleveland Arts prize video about Miller.

 


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In Remembrance: L. Brent Kington & Clare Morison

L. Brent Kington

Brent Kington.The legendary blacksmith, L. Brent Kington passed away on Thursday February 7.  Brent was one of the founding members of SNAG, the first SNAG President, and the recipient of our Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011.  He built the metals dept at Southern Illl. Univ at Carbondale in the late 60s and early 70s. He brought blacksmthing into the program and it is today still the only school that offers an MFA in Blacksmithing.

he has a long record of accomplishments as educator, blacksmith master and mentor.  He has also received honors from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Artist-Blacksmith Association of North America, and received the Gold Medal from the American Craft Council.

For more information on Brent Kington’s life and work read the transcript of an interview conducted by Mary Douglas for the Archives of American Art, Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, for the Smithsonian Institution at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections.

 

Clare Morison

Clare MorisonGrosse Pointe Park resident Clare Morison died Sunday, December 2, 2012, at the age of 66.  Clare was pre-deceased by her long-time partner, Phillip Fike, professor and head of the Metal Arts Department at Wayne State University, and a founding member of SNAG.

Widely known for her artistic talents, she developed “Studio Clare” into a thriving business to create and market wax and metal art work. She developed innovative technologies such as high-temperature wax to expedite her work. Some of her ornamental works have won prize recognition as serious works of art. She also crewed on the beloved family sailboat, Sunshine, a frequent competitor in the Bayview/Mackinaw race and worked tirelessly on its upkeep as a true labor of love.  Claire was also an enthusiastic participant for Habitat for Humanity in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

Clare Morison very generously left a $10,000 bequest to SNAG, naming the organization as the beneficiary of one of her IRA’s.  We are deeply grateful for her support.