Candidate Q&A

Board Candidates Q&A – 2021

What does SNAG mean to you? Why are you interested in committing your time and energy to our organization?

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Jessica Andersen
SNAG has been a part of my life since my first metals course before I even knew this was my career path. Past issues of Metalsmith were always in the studio library to browse. After that first introduction, I quickly became a member. SNAG has been there as a reference to the field, as a network, and has supported my path from student to professional. Joining the board is a way for me to give back to the community. I want to ensure that SNAG is introduced to and has the opportunity to support the next generation of makers.

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Kerianne Quick
To me, SNAG means community, dialog, and growth. I am interested in committing time and energy to SNAG because the community has served me as I was growing as a craftsperson/educator/artist and I want to help make sure SNAG is around to continue doing that for others drawn to the field. Dialog and growth are interrelated. SNAG enables growth through the dialogs it provokes with thoughtful programming and opportunities for it’s members. I hope to be a part of contributing to and facilitating future opportunities to gather, have dialog, and grow. Thus building our community – to make it more inclusive, robust, and sustainable for the future.


What do you think are the characteristics of a great Board member?

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Jessica Andersen
I think the most important characteristic of a great Board member starts with a dedication to serving SNAG and the community. Someone who is passionate about working and moving the organization forward while honoring the past, being present, and looking to the future.

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Kerianne Quick
Ability to work collaboratively, team player/eagerness to pitch in, ability to compromise and work toward a common goal, and killer communication skills (timely, clear, thorough)


Fundraising is a significant obligation of Board service. Can you tell us about your experience in fundraising?

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Jessica Andersen
During graduate school, I served as the president of the Jewelry Student Coop. I attended weekly student organization meetings as well as petitioned the Associated Students Finance Board to fund our events. Working with other students, I helped to organize our annual jewelry sale which raised funds for the visiting artist program. As an artist, I have donated artwork for fundraising events. I have also spoken at gala events about my experience and the importance of funding art non-profits.

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Kerianne Quick
While I am admittedly not a shmoozer, I have written several successful grant proposals. Most notably a $73k grant to build out a Fab Lab at SDSU in the School of Art and Design. I’ve received several artist grants and feel I can bring some of those grant writing skills to look for ways to help support SNAG. I’ve also conceived and implemented a very successful fundraiser in the form of the exhibition AMEND. The exhibition featured 100 jewelers making work to commemorate the 100th year of womens sufferage/voting rights. We raised $10,000+ for Black Voters Matter.


Board members bring experience, wisdom, strategic thinking, and their support network contacts. Can you tell us about yours?

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Jessica Andersen
I have a unique background in diverse settings such as craft centers, recreation centers, and continuing education. I have worked as an educator, visiting artist, and studio manager in a range of towns and cities. Each move has been to accomplish a self-made goal. It has allowed me to expand my professional and academic network.  I have settled back in Southern California where I teach in a private college preparatory. This past year with the shift to virtual, I’ve found more ways to connect with my fellow makers. This has given me the opportunity to collaborate on planning exhibitions, artist talks, and virtual studio visits. I hope to continue bringing people together whether in person or digitally on the board.

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Kerianne Quick
In addition to my grant writing experience, I have considerable experience working in small and medium sized working groups. In addition to working as an elected member of university curriculum, exhibitions, and diversity and inclusion committees, I am also a member of the Faculty Senate – where I represent my college. I serve on the education committee of the Mingei International Museum, where I have used my creative problem solving skills to come up with novel education programing and events. I have a working knowledge of Robert’s Rules of Order, excellent group working/collaboration skills, and robust creative brain storming abilities. My network is primarily made up of academics at the university, community college, and high school levels, as well as a large network of alumni who are small business owners, designers and craftspeople working in jewelry production, and fashion.


What kind of autonomy do you have over your calendar? Are you prepared to commit the needed time to this leadership position?

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Jessica Andersen
I have a set schedule because of teaching which allows me to plan well into the future. I am prepared to commit the needed time and look forward to serving on the board.

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Kerianne Quick
As an educator I have quite a bit of freedom, and in fact am encouraged to serve my field as part of my institutions service expectation. My service to SNAG would be classified this way and is therefore easily justifiable. I am willing to commit my time to this leadership position!


Can you describe a problem you have had to address that reached a point of crisis? How did you solve it?

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Jessica Andersen
The biggest problem that comes to mind is the giant pivot many of us made last year when we were asked to switch our lives and classes online. Jumping into virtual teaching as fast as I could, I quickly developed new ways of presenting information and communicating. Projects were modified to better accommodate this style of making with on-the-fly adjustments. Learning situations fluctuated as the pandemic evolved, resulting in my school switching back and forth and finally settling on a hybrid module of learning with half of my students in-person and the rest watching over Zoom. Over a year later, I don’t think I have “solved” it, but I’ve learned and evolved to better serve my students.

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Kerianne Quick
Clear Communication. Dialog. Compromise.
A few years back we had a cohort of graduate students that developed a very serious series of interpersonal issues. Over the course of several months the issues reached the point where mediation was required. Sitting down as a group, I defined community dialog rules, and facilitated a structured discussion where each student was guided through expressing their grievances and perspectives in a non-accusatory way. This revealed that many of the issues were based on misconceptions and misunderstandings. I was able to guide the group toward an agreement. We wrote a Graduate Studio Code of Conduct document together, helping them to draw healthy boundaries, and have policy to fall back on when issues arose. We have since then reviewed the document every fall, with the cohort including new grad students. It has been a great success!